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  • Accelerating the prediction of large carbon clusters via structure search: Evaluation of machine-learning and classical potentials

    Authors: Bora Karasulu, Jean-Marc Leyssale, Patrick Rowe, Cedric Weber, Carla de Tomas
    DOI: 10.1016/j.carbon.2022.01.031
    Submitted by bkarasulu    
    Number of reviews:   1
    Why should we attempt to reproduce this paper?

    This paper presents a fine example of high-throughput computational materials screening studies, mainly focusing on the carbon nanoclusters of different sizes. In the paper, a set of diverse empirical and machine-learned interatomic potentials, which are commonly used to simulate carbonaceous materials, is benchmarked against the higher-level density functional theory (DFT) data, using a range of diverse structural features as the comparison criteria. Trying to reproduce the data presented here (even if you only consider a subset of the interaction potentials) will help you devise an understanding as to how you could approach a high-throughput structure prediction problem. Even though we concentrate here on isolated/finite nanoclusters, AIRSS (and other similar approaches like USPEX, CALYPSO, GMIN, etc.,) can also be used to predict crystal structures of different class of materials with applications in energy storage, catalysis, hydrogen storage, and so on.

  • Thermodynamics of stacking disorder in ice nuclei

    Authors: David Quigley
    DOI: 10.1063/1.4896376
    Submitted by dquigley      
      Mean reproducibility score:   3.0/10   |   Number of reviews:   1
    Why should we attempt to reproduce this paper?

    The results of this paper have been used in multiple subsequent studies as a benchmark against which other methods of performing the same calculation have been tested. Other groups have challenged the results as suffering from finite size effects, in particular the calculations on mixtures of cubic and hexagonal ice. Should there be time during in the event, participants could check this by performing calculations on larger unit cells. Each individual calculation should converge adequately within 96 hours making it amenable to a HPC ReproHack. Given modern HPC hardware many such calculations could be run concurrently on a single HPC node.